Stem cells could potentially be used for stroke therapy

Researchers from the University of Adelaide in Australia have found that stem cells from teeth grow to resemble brain cells, which could potentially be used in the treatment of stroke patients.

Stem cells are like proto-cellls that have the potential to develop into the many different specialized cells of the body. This function allows them to aid in tissue regeneration, which has led to researching possible advances in treating such conditions as cardiovascular disease, blood disease, autism, and now stroke.

Researchers from the University of Adelaide in Australia have found that stem cells from teeth grow to resemble brain cells, which could potentially be used in the treatment of stroke patients. It is reported that interest in using dental pulp stem cells for post-stroke neurological recovery is growing. Dental pulp stem cells are easier to obtain and less controversial than embryonic stem cells. Research from this clinical study is published in the journal Stem Cell Research & Therapy.

Read more about the study from Medical News Today.


ADDITIONAL READING …

Guided tissue regeneration: background to current indications and applications

The use of stem cells in dental implant site development

Stem cell opportunities for the dental hygienist

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